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Weston, Connecticut, Census Block Numbers 2000 - as local as you can get...


WESTON, CONNECTICUT POPULATION CHANGE:  Quick links to information...and the 2010 Census data as we review it...
Connecticut,
New England and the...
Census Bureau in Washington, D.C.




Connecticut State Data Center at UCONN




U.S. Census/New England City and Town Areas 2006




Link to the U.S. CENSUS BUREAU



WESTON, CT CENSUS GEOGRAPHY: 
U.S. CENSUS 2000 BLOCK GROUP MAP




C E N S U S     2 0 0 0


AT THE VERY TOP OF THIS PAGE is a U.S. Census 2000 map of the census tracts and block groups in Weston, CT.  In yellow is the census block group for an address in the northern part of Town.  NOTE: there are two census tracts in Weston (551 and 552).  In each tract there are three census block groups.  More detail is available for smaller units--blocks--not shown here, but in Weston, census geography gets complicated, as lines are draw from tree to tree (a slight exageration)...below is a sample table, courtesy of the South Western Regional Planning Agency's data guy, no longer working at SWRPA.

Sample Population Density Query
SUMLEV
NAME
AREALAND
Area (sq mi)
Population
Population Density
060
Weston town
51278488
19.7987357470382
10037
506.95156136429
070
Georgetown CDP (part)
420758
0.162455578944767
144
886.396151707157
080
Census Tract 551 (part)
420758
0.162455578944767
144
886.396151707157
085
Urban
420758
0.162455578944767
144
886.396151707157
090
Block Group 1 (part)
420758
0.162455578944767
144
886.396151707157
070
Remainder of Weston town
50857730
19.6362801680934
9893
503.812326739711
080
Census Tract 551 (part)
34180165
13.1970360480435
5528
418.881935297855
085
Rural
16543324
6.38741337797704
1182
185.051433194441
090
Block Group 1 (part)
16543324
6.38741337797704
1182
185.051433194441
085
Urban
17636841
6.80962267006642
4346
638.214510637137
090
Block Group 1 (part)
10232179
3.9506665667949
2478
627.235925407482
090
Block Group 2
4473417
1.7271960333407
1199
694.188717930835
090
Block Group 3
2931245
1.13176006993083
669
591.114687445096
080
Census Tract 552
16677565
6.43924412004998
4365
677.874595002328
085
Rural
59212
2.28618819855536E-02
0
0
090
Block Group 1 (part)
59212
2.28618819855536E-02
0
0
085
Urban
16618353
6.41638223806442
4365
680.28989515387
090
Block Group 1 (part)
5562466
2.14768022091222
1360
633.241386104652
090
Block Group 2
3330853
1.28604958787454
989
769.021668623623
090
Block Group 3
7725034
2.98265242927766
2016
675.908456584139
140
Census Tract 551
34600923
13.3594916269882
5672
424.567053774837
150
Block Group 1
27196261
10.5005355237167
3804
362.267237838319
150
Block Group 2
4473417
1.7271960333407
1199
694.188717930835
150
Block Group 3
2931245
1.13176006993083
669
591.114687445096
140
Census Tract 552
16677565
6.43924412004998
4365
677.874595002328
150
Block Group 1
5621678
2.17054210289777
1360
626.571582363842
150
Block Group 2
3330853
1.28604958787454
989
769.021668623623
150
Block Group 3
7725034
2.98265242927766
2016
675.908456584139
158
Census Tract 551 (part)
420758
0.162455578944767
144
886.396151707157
393
Weston town
51278488
19.7987357470382
10037
506.95156136429
397
Weston town
51278488
19.7987357470382
10037
506.95156136429
441
Weston town (part)
34675952
13.3884604870756
8855
661.390456994519
451
Georgetown CDP (part)
420758
0.162455578944767
144
886.396151707157
451
Remainder of Weston town (part)
34255194
13.2260049081308
8711
658.626702508239
511
Census Tract 551
34600923
13.3594916269882
5672
424.567053774837
511
Census Tract 552
16677565
6.43924412004998
4365
677.874595002328
521
Weston town
51278488
19.7987357470382
10037
506.95156136429



Fixing the Census
NYTIMES
By Alan B. Krueger (Alan B. Krueger is an economics professor at Princeton).
January 26, 2009, 6:31 am

Serious problems in the planning for the 2010 census have been in the news lately. The census has fallen well behind schedule because of technology glitches, and as a result the Government Accountability Office has listed the population count as one of the 13 urgent issues requiring immediate attention in the first year of the new presidential administration, up there with homeland security and Iraq. Without urgent action to prepare and test survey procedures, the 2010 census will miss more people than the 2000 census...more of story here.



Data Show Steady Drop in Americans on Move
NYTIMES
By SAM ROBERTS
December 21, 2008

Despite the nation’s reputation as a rootless society, only about one in 10 Americans moved in the last year — roughly half the proportion that changed residences as recently as four decades ago, census data show.

The monthly Current Population Survey found that fewer than 12 percent of Americans moved since 2007, a decline of nearly a full percentage point compared with the year before. In the 1950s and ’60s, the number of movers hovered near 20 percent.  The number has been declining steadily, and 12 percent is the lowest rate since the Census Bureau began counting people who move in 1940.  An analysis by the Pew Research Center attributes the decline to a number of factors, including the aging of the population (older people are less likely to change residences) and an increase in two-career couples...

Please search the NYTIMES archives for the remainder of this story.





Population loss is threat to our state

Stamford ADVOCATE
Staff Reports
Article Launched: 07/12/2008 02:39:30 AM EDT

Get ready for some competitive congressional races in Connecticut soon after the 2020 Census. That's the time officials say the state is likely to lose one of its five remaining U.S. House seats - we originally had six - and with it one of its seven electoral votes.

The state showed growth over the past year that could charitably be called "anemic." The population rose 0.19 percent in the past year, the equivalent of adding about 6,500 people. In a state of almost 3.5 million, that's almost like going backward.

A multigenerational trend is emptying out the Northeast and filling up the West, specifically places like Arizona, Colorado and Nevada. Those states stand to pick up the congressional seats, and the national clout, that Connecticut and its neighbors appear on track to lose...

Please search the NYTIMES archives for the remainder of this story.




Estimate from State Data Center at UCONN...
Growth stalls in the state
Stamford ADVOCATE
By Kate King, Special Correspondent
Article Launched: 07/11/2008 01:00:00 AM EDT


Fairfield County saw a small increase in population despite a drop statewide, according to census figures released yesterday...

Stamford Mayor Dannel Malloy painted an equally bright picture, estimating a 10-year growth rate of 6 percent for the city, coming from an increase in housing stock.  Malloy also suspected that the census counts miss some of the city's population.

"As much as I think these reports are interesting. . . . I respectfully would argue that it probably undercounts our immigrant population," Malloy said.

The slow statewide growth comes on the heels of a population boom, which lasted from 1995 to 2003, said Orlando Rodriguez, demographer and manager of the Connecticut State Data Center.  The population growth during those eight years was abnormal, a reaction to the end of a deep economic recession that took place in Connecticut from 1990 to 1995.

The population growth rate that Connecticut has experienced since 2004 is "more normal, looking forward, than what happened between 1995 and 2003," Rodriguez said.  But the return to normal of Connecticut's population growth rate isn't necessarily a good thing for the state.

"One of the things that's concerning us is that we're seeing a decline in population in urban areas, which is counter to what we had expected," he said...

Please search the ADVOCATE archives for the remainder of this story.

 


2010 Census: Who Should Count?
By MICHAEL REGAN | Courant Staff Writer
September 30, 2007

Border states in America's South and West are battlegrounds in the debate over illegal immigration, but when it's time to pass out seats in Congress, they are beneficiaries as well, a new study says...

In part, the shift expected in 2010 is the result of a long-term population trend that has states in the South and West growing far faster than states in the Northeast and Midwest. In the 1960s, the Northeast and Midwest had 233 seats in the House, the South and West 202. The numbers roughly reversed two decades later, and now stand at 183 to 252. The new CSDC report projects that the South and West will have 262 seats to 173 for the Northeast and Midwest after 2010.

The winners and losers don't fall strictly along regional lines. New Jersey, for example, with the highest proportion of undocumented workers in the Northeast, would lose one seat if illegal residents were not counted, according to the CSDC projection. Montana would gain a seat if they weren't counted. Louisiana, in the wake of Hurricane Katrina, is expected to lose a seat regardless...

Please search the Hartford Courant archives for the remainder of this story.





Census: Shifting Growth Patterns  Immigration A Powerful Force

By MICHAEL REGAN, Courant Staff Writer
March 22, 2007

If the immigration controversy can be said to have an epicenter in Connecticut it would be Fairfield County, where anti-immigrant forces have made issues of Ecuadorean basketball games in Danbury, worker pickup zones in Stamford and Latino employment at fast-food restaurants all over.

But new census data suggest that without immigration, the county would have had sharp population declines in this decade as tens of thousands of residents left for other parts of the country...

The Rev. Richard Ryscavage, a sociology professor and head of the Center for Faith and Public Life at Fairfield University, said that he sees several reasons for the relative diversity of the Latino population.

"Part of the difference has to do with the socioeconomic situation in Fairfield County, which attracts a stronger diversity because there's more diversity of employment opportunity," he said.

"Proximity to New York City is another factor," he added, with some immigrants who first came to the city "resettling" in Fairfield County and staying there to keep in touch with relatives.

The census also doesn't try to break out illegal immigrants, the particular targets of anti-immigrant activists. It's difficult to find reliable figures on the subject; the Pew Hispanic Center last year estimated that 70,000 to 100,000 unauthorized immigrants live in the state...

Please search the Hartford Courant archives for the remainder of this story.





Connecticut Population Is Declining - 17,000 loss recorded in the last two years  
DAY
By Associated Press   
Published on 2/5/2007
   
Hartford (AP) — Connecticut is once again losing residents to other states, ending a brief period of more robust population growth.

The state lost almost 17,000 more people than moved in between 2005 and 2006, according to the latest Census estimate. An influx of about 14,300 residents from Puerto Rico and foreign countries helped keep Connecticut from a net loss in population, as happened in the early 1990s...

Two age groups appear to be most severely affected by the declining population growth: those who are in their late 20s and 30s and those who are in their late 60s and 70s. Both groups dropped in number during between 2000-2005.

Fairfield University economics professor Edward Deak said that for workers in their prime earnings years, 35 to 55 or 60, Connecticut's high cost of living is offset by the availability of well-paying jobs, particularly in the financial and scientific areas.

“At the other two ends, as people retire they tend to leave the state, and as young people graduate from college they find more attractive opportunities for entry-level positions elsewhere,” he said...

Please search the New London DAY archives for the remainder of this story.


 

Census: More Of Us Than Ever:  State Population Continues Growth, Exceeds 3.5 Million
December 22, 2004
By MIKE SWIFT, Courant Staff Writer

Connecticut's population topped 3.5 million people for the first time in 2004, with the state adding nearly as many people during the past four years as it added during the entire 1990s, the U.S. Census Bureau is reporting today.

Relative to the previous three years, Connecticut's growth slowed this past year, but the state still added more people than any of its New England neighbors and more even than much larger New York state, according to the new population estimates.

The nearly 100,000 people that the Census Bureau estimates that Connecticut added between 2000 and 2004 is only 18,000 below the state's population growth between 1990 and 2000, when Connecticut was one of the nation's slowest growing states.

During the first three years of the decade, between July 2000 and July 2003, the state added more than 20,000 people each year. The Census Bureau said that growth moderated during the past year, as Connecticut added roughly 16,600 people, a 0.5 percent gain, between July 2003 and July 2004.

That population growth compared to 14,600 people in New York and 4,500 in Rhode Island. Massachusetts lost about 4,000 people, making it the only state to suffer a population decline last year, according to the estimates.

"Connecticut doesn't look like the rest of New England," said Orlando Rodriguez, a demographic researcher at the Center for Population Research at the University of Connecticut. "It's not. It's more like New Jersey."

Connecticut's gains, however, were a fraction of those in the fastest growing states; Nevada added about 92,000 people in the past year, growing by 4.1 percent, the fastest percentage growth in the nation.

Connecticut's population gains are being driven by the strong growth among Latinos and Asians, who together are accounting for much of the state's growth, census estimates released earlier this year show. Their gains are likely a combination of people migrating to Connecticut from abroad and from other states, particularly the New York City area, as well as births in Connecticut, experts say.

"Connecticut seems to be geographically a good place [for Asians] because it is close to New York," said Angela Rola, director of the Asian-American Cultural Center at UConn...

Please search the Hartford Courant archives for the remainder of this story.






Orlando Rodriquez final report on line (see below)

Statistics Suggest Problems In Future For Connecticut; Glimpse of state's population in 2030 shows aging, segregation 
DAY
By Karin Crompton   
Published on 5/16/2007
 
For the next 25 years, Connecticut's population will keep getting older and more segregated, a state data center concludes in projections released today...

“The baby boomers didn't have enough kids to support them in retirement, is what it boils down to,” said Orlando Rodriguez, manager of the Connecticut State Data Center, which released the projections today. “We need to make up the shortfall somewhere...”

“Whoa!” he yelped over the phone, clicking on the town of Lyme. Its total dependency ratio is projected to reach 110 by 2030 — every 100 working people in Lyme will have to support 110 retirees.

But these are statistics, after all.

“This is a wealthy retirement community, so that may not mean anything,” he said.

Overall, the state is projected to gain just three new residents for every 1,000 existing residents annually until 2030. Locally, the numbers foretell much the same. New London County's total population is projected to grow at a rate of 0.02 percent by 2030, down from 0.20 percent in 2005.

Some of the more startling projections include:

• Sprague's median age, which was 43.2 in 2005, will climb to 65.9 in 2030

• Waterford's population drops from 18,303 in 2005 to 16,758 in 2030.

• East Lyme, considered a hub for 55-and-older housing, is projected to see a decrease in the population's median age, from 43 in 2005 to 40.7 in 2030.

Rodriguez is quick to point out that the projections are different from predictions.

“We look at the past and we do not take into account anything that will happen in the future,” he said. “It's not an economic forecast — if the (sub) base closes, they put in an Ikea, build 100 houses ... It's not like that.”

Rodriguez said the data represents “one scenario. This may happen, not that it will happen...”

•••••

The Center groups the state's 169 municipalities into five categories: rural, suburban, urban core, urban periphery and wealthy. The definitions for each category come from a combination of population density (people per square mile), median family income and the percentage of the population that falls under the poverty threshold...

While race was not used to determine categories, the Center concludes that the state's minorities are most concentrated in the urban centers, or “urban core” towns.

While the urban core classification accounted for 19 percent of the state's population in 2000, the Center reports, more than half of the state's blacks and Hispanics lived there. At the same time, more than half of the state's white population lived in towns that were at least 90 percent white.

Statewide in 2000, 78 percent of towns were at least 90 percent white.

“I think one of the leading misconceptions is that Connecticut is a racially diverse state,” said Rodriguez, who moved here from New Orleans in 2002. “People say a quarter of the population is minorities and it's the same nationwide. That may be true, but that quarter is limited to seven towns in the state. So our minorities are segregated.”

The population projections can be seen at ctsdc.uconn.edu/Projections-Towns/townList-css.html.

The town listings by category can be seen at  http://www.ctsdc.uconn.edu/Projections-Towns/groups_5CTs.html

 
Please search the New London DAY archives for the remainder of this story.



POPULATION PROJECTION  IN CT:  What are the assumptions behind these numbers?  See below!
UCONN RESEARCH FOR CT:  http://www.ctsdc.uconn.edu/Projections-Towns/groups_5CTs.html

The calculations and assumptions that form the basis for these population projections are drawn from historical patterns of population change.  Thus, these projections reveal how populations may evolve over the next twenty-five years - if these historical patterns continue to hold true.  However, there is no guarantee that the projected trends will occur.  A host of external influences, such as public policy initiatives at the state and federal levels or significant shifts in economic structure, may lead to new patterns of change in the population. 



Fairfield County population dwindling
ROB VARNON rvarnon@ctpost.com
Article Last Updated: 08/09/2007 09:47:28 PM EDT

More than 10,000 people moved out of Fairfield County, according to the U.S. Census Bureau, which said Connecticut's largest county lost population between 2005 and 2006...

Please search the CT POST archives for the remainder of this story.


.


Census Damage Control
NYTIMES editorial
Published: June 23, 2008

Preparations for the 2010 census are a shambles...

Over the next several months, Congress can keep the census preparations from deteriorating further. Come 2009, the next president and the next Congress will have to give a new census team all the help it needs to try to get the count firmly on track by 2010.

Please search the NYTIMES archives for the remainder of this story.




2010 Census: Who Should Count?
By MICHAEL REGAN | Courant Staff Writer
September 30, 2007

Border states in America's South and West are battlegrounds in the debate over illegal immigration, but when it's time to pass out seats in Congress, they are beneficiaries as well, a new study says...

The winners and losers don't fall strictly along regional lines. New Jersey, for example, with the highest proportion of undocumented workers in the Northeast, would lose one seat if illegal residents were not counted, according to the CSDC projection. Montana would gain a seat if they weren't counted. Louisiana, in the wake of Hurricane Katrina, is expected to lose a seat regardless.

The new report suggests that the country's illegal immigrant population is playing an increasing role in congressional apportionment. After the 2000 Census, an analysis by the Center for Immigration Studies found that illegal immigrant populations affected the apportionment of four seats. The CSDC report projects that six seats will be affected by undocumented residents after 2010...

Please search the Hartford Courant archives for the remainder of this story.





Committee Will Tackle Congressional Districts Last
CT NEWSJUNKIE
by Christine Stuart | Sep 13, 2011 2:34pm
Posted to: Congress, Election 2012, State Capitol

The bipartisan Reapportionment Committee has gotten a lot of work done since it started in April, but it admitted at it meeting Tuesday that it won’t meet its Sept. 15 deadline.  The laws governing the committee dictate that the four legislative leaders will need to be reappointed by Gov. Dannel P. Malloy, then they will reappoint the four other lawmakers currently on the committee before naming a ninth member.

They will have 30 days to appoint the ninth member.  Sen. Minority Leader John McKinney, R-Fairfield, said the committee’s inability to reach a conclusion on how to draw the political districts in the state is “not because of any partisan rancor or acrimony.”

“It’s just an enormous task and an incredibly important task,” McKinney said...

Please search the CTNEWSJUNKIE archives for the remainder of this story.




Please search the CTNEWSJUNKIE archives for the remainder of this story.



A Republican Bonus in 2012
The GOP is poised to reap redistricting rewards.
Michael Barone, National Review
November 8, 2010 12:00 A.M.


Let’s try to put some metrics on last Tuesday’s historic election. Two years ago, the popular vote for the House of Representatives was 54 percent Democratic and 43 percent Republican. In historic perspective, that’s a landslide. The Democrats didn’t win the House popular vote in the South, as they did from the 1870s up through 1992, but they won a larger percentage in the 36 non-Southern states, as far as I can tell, than ever before.

We don’t yet know this year’s House popular vote down to the last digit, partly because California takes five weeks to count all its votes (Brazil, which voted last Sunday, counted its votes in less than five hours). But the nationwide exit poll had it at 52 percent Republican and 46 percent Democratic, which is probably within a point or so of the final number.

That’s similar to 1994, and you have to go back to 1946 and 1928 to find years when Republicans did better. The numbers from those years aren’t commensurate, though, since the then-segregated and Democratic South cast few popular votes (blacks were effectively disfranchised, and since the all-but-certain winner was chosen in the Democratic primary, many southerners didn’t bother to vote in the general election). So you could argue that this is the best Republican showing ever.

Nationally, Republicans narrowly missed winning Senate seats in heavily Democratic Washington and in Nevada and California, where less problematic nominees might have won. As in all wave years, they missed winning half a dozen House seats by a whisker (or a suddenly discovered bunch of ballots)...


Please search the National Review archives for the remainder of this story.




Poll reveals baby boomers' retirement fears
YAHOO
By ALAN FRAM, Associated Press
5 April 2011

WASHINGTON – Baby boomers facing retirement are worried about their finances, and many believe they'll need to work longer than planned or will never be able to retire, a new poll finds.

The 77 million-strong generation born between 1946 and 1964 has clung tenaciously to its youth. Now, boomers are getting nervous about retirement. Only 11 percent say they are strongly convinced they will be able to live in comfort.

A total of 55 percent said they were either somewhat or very certain they could retire with financial security. But another 44 percent express little or no faith they'll have enough money when their careers end.

Further underscoring the financial squeeze, 1 in 4 boomers still working say they'll never retire. That's about the same number as those who say they have no retirement savings.

The Associated Press-LifeGoesStrong.com poll comes as politicians face growing pressure to curb record federal deficits, and budget hawks of both parties have expressed a willingness to scale back Social Security, the government's biggest program.

The survey suggests how politically risky that would be: 64 percent of boomers see Social Security as the keystone of their retirement earnings, far outpacing pensions, investments and other income...

Please search the A.P. or YAHOO archives for the remainder of this story.





C E N S US    2 0 1 0     D A T A     F O R     W E S T O N ,    C O N N E C T I C U T
Source:  South Western Regional Planning Agency





A MAP OF POPULATION DENSITY IN WESTON 2010, U.S. Census of Population and Housing



THE ACTUAL DATA FOR WESTON;  American Community Survey Data 2005-2009 here, offering the snapshot of Weston population and housing in greater depth.



Click on spread sheet above to get 2005-2009 "Rolling Census" American Community Survey data for Weston.   This source will give you much of the detail Weston got from the Census 2000 and earlier - statistically it was collected differently - but it might even be more accurated than samples from the past!  Mostly because it has come out sooner!